Amy Shelton

Amy Shelton
Amy Shelton’s recent work is a visual exegesis of the human relationship with the natural world, and an exploration of our relationship with place, landscape, and natural systems. In 2011, she established the Honeyscribe project funded by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award. Through this project, Shelton aims to explore the relationship between bee health, human health, the environment and the arts through artistic practice, developing new artworks and curating public events.
Shelton’s Florilegium: Honey Flow Series (2014) https://youtu.be/qyCnDy-dqWs was purchased by the Wellcome Collection where it is permanently installed. This series of lightboxes was created through her meticulous gathering of hundreds of botanical samples collected, classified and preserved at the peak of their bloom, which became a vibrant palette with which she created this series. The pressed flowers, arranged chronologically in order of their flowering times, capture the ephemeral and astonishingly subtle choreography of the plant-pollinator relationship. Reading as a slowed-down metronome of the seasons, these artworks chart a bees-eye view of the UK’s wild, cultivated and agricultural floral sources of pollen and nectar, mapping and illuminating bio-diversity from the first flourishing crescendo of early spring through to the summer months, ebbing towards the quieter overture of autumn and winter. In 2016 Shelton was commissioned by the Crown Estate to make a public artwork the Princesshay Honey Flow, which is installed in the shopping precinct, to celebrate the cities bees and the habitat that supports them.
Amy Shelton and award-winning author John Burnside are working on a new collaborative artwork Bee Myths in 2018 as the next phase of their ongoing artistic collaboration.
Recent exhibitions include: Southbank Centre, Eden Project, Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh, Peninsula Arts Plymouth University, Wellcome Collection London, Gallery of the Literary Bureau, Schwalenberg, Germany, DAAD Gallery Berlin, Princesshay Exeter, Kurt Jackson Foundation Gallery.
Skills

Posted on

6th September 2017

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